IAN SWEET

CS Presents

IAN SWEET

Post Life, Media Jeweler

Saturday, April 8, 2017

7:00 pm

Ché Café Collective

$10.00 - $12.00

Off Sale

This event is all ages

IAN SWEET
IAN SWEET
"I have a way of loving too many things to take on just one shape," Jilian Medford sings over and over again on the title track of the Brooklyn-based band IAN SWEET's debut album, Shapeshifter, repeating it like a mantra. This is Medford's thesis statement, a narrator to carry us through Shapeshifter, which is above all else a meditation on loneliness and displacement. It's about losing love and your sense of self in the process, about grabbing at the little things in life that bring joy when nothing else is going according to plan. It's also an ode to the bandmates, and the friends, that see you through.
IAN SWEET started in 2014 with a string of text messages. Medford was a few days away from embarking on her first tour when the driver and drummer she recruited cancelled. Medford sent IAN SWEET drummer Tim Cheney -- whom she barely knew -- a series of desperate messages, asking if he knew how to drum and whether or not he would be willing to take two weeks off of life to go on tour. Cheney responded soon after with a simple: "Yes."

Medford and Cheney's friendship evolved from their time spent on the road into something that she describes as intuitive, telepathic. At the time, Medford had been performing solo under the moniker IAN -- in honor of the nickname her skater friends gave her in high school -- and put out a self-recorded EP titled Have You Ever Loved Anything This Much. That year, she and Cheney enlisted bassist Damien Scalise, and IAN SWEET became a trio. Medford describes Cheney and Scalise as polar opposites that compliment one another; two charged forces that she mediates, forming a platonic balance that brought Medford stability at a time when she didn't have any.

While she was writing Shapeshifter, Medford's life was in turmoil. She ended an emotionally abusive relationship in Boston, graduated from Berklee College of Music, and briefly moved home to the San Fernando Valley, thinking she would stay there. Medford was unsure of the band's future and suffering from a severe, undiagnosed panic disorder. When she returned to Boston to record the album in July of 2015 alongside Cheney and Scalise, Medford was reminded of everything she'd hoped to escape after graduation. She felt stagnant; trudging through a quicksand made up of heartbreak and severe depression, a process she references on Shapeshifter stand-out "Slime Time Live."

That's one of many lighthearted, nostalgic references on the album that subvert the pain beneath. Like its title suggests, most of the songs on Shapeshifter don't settle in a particular scene so much as they delve into a sensibility. Whether Medford's singing about Slime Time Live, eating ice cream in bed on "All Skaters Go To Heaven," or honoring her favorite athlete Michael Jordan on "#23," Medford displaces loneliness by falling in love with the small things that make her happy; like skateboarding, basketball, candy, and her preferred footwear: Crocs.

Accompanied by Cheney and Scalise's playful instrumentation, Shapeshifter becomes a celebratory purging, an album that finds humor in self-deprecation and vice. IAN SWEET's debut interrogates capital-e Existence through a candy-coated lens, their mathy precision scaffolding the chaos of Medford's personal neurosis and turning those anxieties into something hook-laden and relatable.

And though the narrative of Shapeshifter clings to an ex-lover, the yearning felt on this album isn't directed at a particular individual so much as it's turned inward.

"You know the feeling. When you really like someone, you forget to do anything for yourself, you forget all of the things that gave you your shape," Medford says. "The things that form your absolute."

On Shapeshifter, IAN SWEET prove that there is no one absolute; just the ease that comes with knowing everything will be OK as long as you hold tight to the pocket-sized things in life that bring happiness while you watch the rest of your world fall apart in slow-motion.
Post Life
4 piece Wonder-Punk-Gaze-Wave from Los Angeles.
Media Jeweler
Media Jeweler arose as a veritable phoenix out of the ashes of a revolving-door big band following an unexpected but celebratory funeral pyre supporting A Hawk and A Hacksaw in LA. Calls were made and within two weeks a leaner and decidedly meaner entity emerged, outlook fresh.

2 years later, "$99 R/T Hawaii" aims to capture the relentless restlessness of being alive on this increasingly weird and overstimulating planet. It was recorded and mixed in a casual and really quite nice three-day session during the dawn of spring at Machines with Magnets by Seth Manchester and Keith Souza (Battles, Lightning Bolt, etc.). It was mastered a week later by XOQ (Liars, Factory Floor, Martin Gore, etc.). The mood varies drastically on each of the seven tracks that make up the narrative of the album. We celebrated its completion with a few dozen jello shots at the local watering hole where we witnessed a man with a voice like crushed charcoal yell and storm out while Kid Rock's deepest cuts droned.

Please note that MJ prefers to be referred to as a Rock Band full-stop, jubilantly taking into consideration all the trappings and tropes associated with Rock music. The nuance lost with the variety of modifying adjectives that can precede "Rock" is priceless.

While the underground and DIY music zeitgeist seems to be shifting to the more de rigueur palette of cold synths and hot beats, the poor guitar seems often to be seen as a vestige of something that has seen its moment in the sun and belongs on a wall or in a dumpster. Perhaps it does.

We embrace this. Everything always must come full circle; inversion is key in development, and moving forward is all that one can do.
Venue Information:
Ché Café Collective
1000 Scholars Dr
La Jolla, CA, 92093
http://thechecafe.blogspot.com/