Piebald

Piebald

Facial, Tough Age

Sunday, January 28, 2018

8:00 pm

Soda Bar

$20.00

Tickets at the Door

This event is 21 and over

Piebald
Piebald
Emocore outfit Piebald formed in 1994 when vocalist/guitarist Travis Shettel, guitarist Aaron Stuart, bassist Andrew Bonner and drummer Jon Sullivan were still high school students in suburban Andover, MA. Sullivan left a few years later; Alex Garcia Rivera stepped in before the band ultimately settled down with Luke Garro behind the kit.

Quickly becoming a staple of the Boston-area indie circuit, Piebald released their first album, When Life Hands You Lemons, in 1997 via Hydra Head Records. They followed up two years later with If It Weren't for Venetian Blinds It Would Be Curtains for Us All, which further presented the band's lighthearted spin on typical emo values, offering such song titles as "Fat and Skinny Asses."

The EP The Rock Revolution Will Not Be Televised appeared in 2000 before Piebald amicably split to focus on life outside the band. Boston-based imprint Big Wheel Recreation released the dual-disc retrospective Barely Legal/All Ages the following year, which collected shaky recordings from their high school days all the way up through their 1997 debut; the set also included all of Piebald's early 7" EPs, some demos, live cuts (including a blistering cover of the Beatles' "I Saw Her Standing There"), and out-of-print tracks. During the break, Shettel also put out a solo record under the appropriate project name of Totally Travis.

The band's separation didn't last long, however; Piebald announced their return in 2002 with We Are the Only Friends We Have, a fun-yet-mature album that was quickly embraced by fans and critics alike. A single from that album, "American Hearts," saw minor success on MTV and was even sampled a few years later by MC Lars on his emo-laptop-rap "iGeneration."

It was a year of unprecedented good fortune for the band, but things took a turn for the worse when Shettel had to undergo throat surgery. Shettel's health problems resulted in the cancellation of a string of live shows (opening up for Dashboard Confessional, no less), but the band wasn't down for long. Shettel healed up in a few months' time, and Piebald headed back out on the road to headline with bands like My Chemical Romance, Minus the Bear, and Fairweather in tow.

By early 2004, Piebald had inked a deal with Cali-based indie label SideOneDummy, and their next album, All Ears, All Eyes, All the Time, came out that May. Late in the next year, while the band toured with Hot Rod Circuit in their new environmentally friendly, vegetable oil powered van, the CD/DVD B-sides collection Killa Bros and Killa Bees was issued. Piebald's next proper full-length, Accidental Gentlemen, hit stores in January 2007.

Piebald's last show was on April 19, 2008 at Cambridge, MA's Middle East Downstairs, though the band reunited for sets at The Bamboozle festival in California and New Jersey in early 2010.

~Erik Hage / All Music Guide
Facial
Facial
FACIAL makes the noise that cuts like a chainsaw through the thick buildup of residue in your mind, left behind by years of dealing with the dull banality of life.
They take the dead parts of your brain killed by mundane repetition and blasts it away with a pressure hose, while the low end rattles all the barnacles off your body and pounds you the way you are always afraid to ask for. Sweet melodies interchange with primal screaming as you fluctuate between comfort and discomfort, horror and jubilation, familiarity and utter confusion.

FACIAL aren’t always making sense. In fact, they have been known to not make sense at all. It makes perfect sense considering the difficulty of true communication. This is due to the subjective nature of reality, lack of attention due to mass distraction, and the fact that anything anybody does can be taken out of context and framed to be perceived in any which way you want! These are just a few factors, so imagine trying to boil down a live, complex organism, such as a band, to a concise couple of paragraphs, using words! what a difficult task!

Who wants to read anyways! What could somebody read about a band that would even peak their interest? A cute story? Their musical references and antecedents? Perhaps some affiliation with a more well-known artist? Maybe we are completely bored with words now and they have lost all actual meaning, and only the right combination of emojis will titillate interest anymore?
If FACIAL were to be represented only by emojis, it would probably be: The guy with sunglasses on, Upside-down smiley guy, and The guy with x’s for eyes. bored to death.
Tough Age
Tough Age
In the two years since Tough Age’s sophomore LP, I Get The Feeling Central, the curmudgeonly comic book loving band have reinvented themselves. Founding members Jarrett Samson and Penny Clark relocated to Toronto from Vancouver, channelling their love of Flying Nun indie-pop into a new three-piece line-up with drummer Jesse Locke (Century Palm, Simply Saucer). The first glimpse at this new direction was their “Guess Not/Unclean” 7” EP, now followed by their long-awaited third album, Shame, due out on Mint Records on October 20th, 2017.

Recorded and mixed by Freelove Fenner’s Peter Woodford in his Montreal studio The Bottle Garden (TOPS, Moss Lime), with cover art by comic artist Patrick Kyle and mastering by Mint’s own Jay Arner, Shame is Tough Age’s most collaborative effort to date. Honing their econo jams on tours across North America and over the sea to Tokyo, while sharing a stage with artists such as The Courtneys, HSY, and recent Mint signees Woolwoorm, the trio has re-emerged with a fresh set of songs that are simultaneously minimal, dynamically propulsive, and eerily experimental.

Shame’s first side is charged with fuzzy pop energy, from frenetic opener “Everyday Life” to the herky-jerky punctuations of “Piquant Frieze” to the sweetly rambling “Reflected.” On the b-side, Tough Age delve into their emotional honesty with the swooning “Pageantry” (“The biggest bummer of a song I’ve ever written, which is saying something” laughs Samson) and the powerfully contemplative title track, closing the album with extended surges of feedback.

Limiting overdubs while trying to record as much live in the studio as possible, plus paring an original set of 20 songs down to a sleek eight songs in 32 minutes, the most noticeable addition to Shame is Clark’s lead vocals on a pair of standout tunes. Switching to bass for Tough Age’s new line-up, “Ghost” is a heavier reworking of a song by her Vancouver punk band The Drearies, while “Me In Glue” finds Clark increasing in shouty intensity over chorus-drenched guitars.

“I don't like to complain or express frustration very much in everyday life because I want to trick people into thinking I am a very calm person,” says Clark. “But there are lots of things that bother me and I think about them a lot so I try to put all those feelings into my songs and then I have an excuse to yell about things. Maybe you've also felt things like that and we can feel them together.”

While the prominent placement of a Tough Age poster above Archie Andrews’ bed in the TV series Riverdale was a hilarious thrill for the band, their musical tastes dig much deeper. On Shame, the influence of New Zealand acts continues to loom large with Tough Age’s tribute to The Clean on the slyly titled “Unclean.” Less obvious inspirations include early ’80s London, ON group The Hippies, the off-kilter drumming of U.S. Maple, and the austere lyricism of The Urinals’ “punk haikus.”

Following the album's release, Samson says Tough Age plan to "keep playing music, keep putting out music, tour, have fun, not get on each other’s nerves too much, and refuse to compromise our intentions."
Venue Information:
Soda Bar
3615 El Cajon Blvd
San Diego, CA, 92104
http://www.sodabarmusic.com/