The Moondoggies

The Moondoggies

Erik Blood, Malachi Henry and the Lights

Saturday, April 21, 2018

8:30 pm

Soda Bar

$10.00 - $12.00

Tickets at the Door

This event is 21 and over

The Moondoggies
The Moondoggies
A Love Sleeps Deep’s bones rattle with all the seismic changes of the last five years since the release of The Moondoggies’ Adios I’m a Ghost. While the Washington band got lumped in early on with the woodsy folk-rock/Americana movement that sprung up in the Pacific Northwest in the 2000s, the core Moondoggies sound has always been rock in the more classical sense–more Pink Floyd than Woody Guthrie. A Love Sleeps Deep crystalizes that.

Perhaps more importantly, A Love Sleeps Deep finds singer/guitarist Kevin Murphy at his most pointed as a songwriter. There’s no lyrical pussyfooting this time around. Lacking the need to prove himself, he opens up and lays bare his feelings.

“Generally, I feel frustrated because there’s a lot of this escapist stuff going on in rock and roll,” says Murphy. “I just didn’t want to not talk about my frustrations with what I was seeing around me. I have two little girls now, and I’m just thinking about where things are going. Love in my life has changed everything.”

While the album on a whole is about love, there’s an unmistakable anger boiling under the surface. Murphy captures the life-altering glory of finding real love on “Sick in Bed” and “Easy Coming,” and speaks to that special unbridled brand of parental love on “My Mother.” But the highs exasperate his counterbalancing frustrations. He sings with poetic pointedness about the casual racism his girlfriend has faced on “Cinders” and how we’re all ruining the planet his daughters will inherit on “Underground (A Love Sleeps Deep).” He further lets his political feelings be heard on the distorted (literal) barnburner, “Soviet Barn Fire.”

Recorded in Seattle in the spring of 2017 with production wizard Erik Blood (Shabazz Places, Tacocat, THEESatisfaciton), A Love Sleeps Deep is also an album of collaboration. The band seemingly threw each tune up in the air to see how it bounced around the room, making sure everyone got their hands on it. From around 30 initial demos, Blood helped select the most jam-heavy numbers. “They had that vibe that made me love the band in the first place, but with a weathered distinction and confidence that moved me,” says Blood.

With the passage of time, the band feels more comfortable in its own skin. Carl Dahlen’s drums sonically lead the way, crafting a stellar template for everyone else. Dahlen’s rhythm section cohort, bassist Robert Terreberry, further helps lock in the grooves over Caleb Quick’s keys. In addition to lead guitar work, Jon Pontrello taught himself pedal steel since the last record, and it’s intentionally not employed (as a matter of band philosophy) on the more country-leaning tunes, instead adding a more cosmic feel to the heaviest tracks.

What has The Moondoggies found inside of themselves in the years they’ve been gone that makes A Love Sleeps Deep stand out? What’s come to the forefront?

“Rawness,” says Blood. “Like a monster singing lullabies.”
Erik Blood
Erik Blood
Erik Blood is a Seattle-based producer, multi-instrumentalist, and singer/songwriter. His production work and collaborations with some of the Northwest’s favorite artists (Shabazz Palaces, Moondoggies, The Lights, The Turn-Ons among others) have garnered praise from music journalists and fans alike.

In May 2009, Erik Blood released his first solo album “The Way We Live”. The album debuted at number one on KEXP’s variety chart and was hailed by The Stranger upon it’s release: “Crafted with care and expertly produced, The Way We Live seems destined to attain pop-classic status.”

Along with production work on a variety of projects, Erik is currently finishing up work on an independent film score as well as a follow-up LP to "The Way We Live".
Malachi Henry and the Lights
Malachi Henry and the Lights
San Diego-based quintet, Malachi Henry and the Lights is an alternative rock band deeply rooted in the raw and haunting sounds of early gospel and Southern soul, tempered with synth and sampled electronics.

When lead singer and songwriter, Ben Hernandez, left his home in California for North Carolina he eventually walked away from professional music as well. He continued writing though, crafting new songs that reflected his life in the South. They spoke of longing for the company of old friends, his time as a traveling salesman, and wrestling with spirituality. As he drove the stretches of highway and long-forgotten main streets through places like Mississippi, Louisiana and Tennessee, the sounds of Malachi Henry and the Lights began to emerge.

"I had come to a turnrow of sorts," says Ben. "I looked back at the music I had done in the past and realized that so much new and different music lay ahead me. So, after some heavy contemplation I turned back to the 'field' and went to work."

After returning to California, Hernandez assembled a band that would draw his songs off the page and give them a life of their own. And the timing was finally perfect. Ben recalls, "Each musician I reached out to, because of current or past band situations, all told me pretty much the same thing; that they were ready for something different, ready for music a little outside their comfort zones. I was ready for a change as well. Moving back to San Diego after living in North Carolina for so long, with new songs and new perspective on my music, was definitely humbling. I use this analogy a lot: that you need to prune a tree once-in-awhile to promote its growth and bear good fruit."

Malachi Henry and the Lights is the sound of well water flowing up from dry land. It's the shout from the back pew of a Wednesday night church service. It's the metallic hiss of thousands of cicadas pulsing from the trees.
Venue Information:
Soda Bar
3615 El Cajon Blvd
San Diego, CA, 92104
http://www.sodabarmusic.com/